Internal migration dynamics in Africa and Asia: Implications for poverty reduction and development

The 15th Annual Global Development Network Conference 18-20 June 2014, ‘Structural transformation in Africa and beyond’,  will include a parallel session based on Migrating out of Poverty research, ‘Internal migration dynamics in Africa and Asia: Implications for poverty reduction and development’. The conference organisers aim to encourage a better understanding of the nature and prospects of structural transformation in Africa. The papers in this session will address that theme by providing an understanding of internal migration dynamics and poverty linkages and their policy implications. They are based on research by partners from the Migrating out of Poverty Research Programme Consortium.

Speakers

Professor John Oucho, Director African Migration and Development Policy Centre: Changing perspectives of internal migration in Eastern Africa

Paper abstract: This paper analyses the changing perspectives of internal migration in Eastern Africa, hereby delineated as the region encompassing the traditional East Africa and the Horn of Africa. It relies on literature survey of published work and analysis of data over the last five decades. Internal migration perspectives have been changing as voluntary migration continued alongside forced and irregular internal migration in virtually all the countries of the region, precipitating diverse consequences for development in areas both of origin and destination. This paper is expected to chart future research to inform national policies and programmes on internal migration in Eastern Africa.

Presentation: Changing perspectives of internal migration in eastern Africa [PDF 358.14KB]

 

Professor George Owusu, Department of Geography and Resource Development, University of Ghana: Can rural–urban migration contribute to poverty reduction?: Evidence from Ghana

Paper abstract: Recent evidence indicates increasing levels of poverty in urban areas in Ghana, partly attributed to net migration of poor migrants to cities. Evidence of the connection between urbanisation, rural-urban migration and poverty outcome is mixed. The study examines the livelihoods of poor migrants living and working in two urban informal settlements in Accra. The findings suggest that, despite living in a harsh environment with little social protection, the migrants perceived that their overall well-being had been enhanced by migrating to Accra. These findings call for a more nuanced understanding of the linkages between rural-urban migration, urbanisation and poverty.

Presentation: Can rural-urban migration contribute to poverty reduction?: Evidence from Ghana [PDF 575.96KB]

 

Professor L. Alan Winters, CEO Migrating out of Poverty RPC, University of Sussex: Migration in the time of crisis: Evidence on its effectiveness from Indonesia

Paper abstract: This paper explores the role of geographic mobility as a major element of economic adjustment after the occurrence of a spatially-heterogeneous economic shock. At this aim, the high degree of mobility in Indonesia during the years of the East-Asian financial crisis is exploited; estimates are presented on the effectiveness of migration of adults in Indonesia (1998-2000) on the evolution of living standards, as measured by consumption per capita, by 2000 and by 2007/8. Evidence from Indonesia suggests that migration in times of crisis is an effective strategy on average.

Presentation: Migration in the time of crisis: evidence on its effectiveness from Indonesia [PDF 1.46MB]

 

Joseph Yaro, Department of Geography and Resource Development, University of Ghana: Discussant

Chair: Professor Mariama Awumbila, Centre for Migration Studies, University of Ghana